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DUTCH Complete™

$399 $375

This test is a comprehensive assessment of sex and adrenal hormones and their metabolites. It also includes the daily, free cortisol pattern, organic acids, melatonin (6-OHMS), and 8-OHdG.

DUTCH Complete Female Sample Report

DUTCH Complete Male Sample Report

 

Description

This test is a comprehensive assessment of sex and adrenal hormones and their metabolites. It also includes the daily, free cortisol pattern, organic acids, melatonin (6-OHMS), and 8-OHdG.

DUTCH vs. Saliva Testing

While the free cortisol pattern in saliva has clinical value, there is a significant missing piece to surveying a patient’s HPA-Axis function with saliva testing – measuring cortisol metabolites. To properly characterize a patient’s cortisol status, free and metabolized cortisol should be measured to avoid misleading results when cortisol clearance is abnormally high or low. Likewise with sex hormones, measuring estrogen and androgen metabolites gives a fuller picture for more precise clinical diagnosis of hormonal imbalances and HRT monitoring.

DUTCH vs. Serum Testing

While the most universally accepted testing method (due to the availability of FDA-cleared analyzers that are reliable and inexpensive), serum testing is lacking in some areas. Adrenal hormones cannot be effectively tested in serum because free cortisol cannot be tested throughout the day. There is also a lack of extensive metabolite testing (especially for cortisol and estrogens).

DUTCH vs. 24-Hour Urine Testing

There are two primary drawbacks to 24-hour urine testing of hormones. First, the collection is cumbersome, and as many as 40% of those who collect, do so in error (Tanaka, 2002). Secondly, dysfunction in the diurnal pattern of cortisol cannot be ascertained from a 24-hour collection. Some providers add saliva for daily free cortisol. DUTCH eliminates the need for two tests.

Do values compare favorably to 24-hour collections? The DUTCH correlation to 24-hour collections is excellent (see graph, left). Because the dried samples span about 12-14 hours of the day (6-8 hours overnight plus 2 hours per day collection), they represent the entire day’s hormone production. A weighted average of the four samples is combined and measured for all hormones other than cortisol and cortisone. Values must be presented relative to creatinine (ng per mg of creatinine) to correct for hydration. This replaces the 24-hour value. The excellent correlation to 24-hour collections makes this model a very respectable alternative to 24-hour collections. With the addition of diurnal free cortisol, it becomes an improvement.

Do dried samples compromise the analysis? Dried samples are accurate for hormone testing, and values correlate to liquid samples. Samples are stable once they are dried and easier to ship than liquid samples.

Methods Used for Testing
Cortisol, cortisone, 8-OHdG, melatonin (6-OHMS), organic acid tests and metabolites related to cortisol are tested by LC-MS/MS. The remaining hormones are tested by GC-MS/MS. The most accurate methods available are used for all tests. These methods show increased accuracy over immunoassays used in typical serum and saliva testing.

What is the Cortisol Awakening Response and how do we test for it?

When we open our eyes upon waking, cortisol levels naturally begin to rise by an average of 50%. 30 minutes after waking, cortisol levels will still show this sharp increase. By 60 minutes after waking, cortisol levels have peaked and begin to decline. Measuring this rise and fall of cortisol levels at waking can be used as a “mini stress test”. Research shows that the size of this increase correlates with HPA-axis function, even if the sample measurements are all within range. A quick saturation of saliva swabs upon waking, and at 30 and 60 minutes after waking, provide what is required to assess a patient’s Cortisol Awakening Response.

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